Blackfoot vs. Cherokee vs, Alabama Coushatta??

A MAP OF UNITED STATE COVERING THE HERITAGE OF MY FOREFATHERS. If this at all seems possible.....
THIS IS A MATERNAL SIDE/but there has been no evidence for the paternal side.

JUST AS HAPPY AS A BUG IN A RUG

Important Blackfoot Mythological Figures
Old Man (also known by his Blackfoot name, Naapi, or spelling variants such as Napi, Nape, Napa, Napiw, Napioa, Na-pe, Na'pi, Na'pe, or Old-Man.) Naapi is the benevolent culture hero of the Blackfoot tribe (sometimes referred to as a "transformer" by folklorists.) He is a trickster, a troublemaker, and sometimes a foolish person, but he is also responsible for the shaping of the world the Blackfeet live in and frequently helps the people. He is assisted in these tasks by his wife, Old Woman or Old Lady (Kipitaki or Kipitaakii in Blackfoot). In some Blackfoot Indian legends both Old Man and Old Woman are associated with coyotes (some Blackfoot storytellers even call them "Old Man Coyote" and "Old Lady Coyote," as the Crow Indians do.) In other Blackfoot legends they have no particular connection with coyotes and are instead described as the first man and woman made by the Creator, who in turn made the rest of humankind. Naapi shares some similarities with other Algonquian heroes such as the Cree Wisakejak, Wabanaki Glooscap, and Anishinabe Nanabozho, and many of the same stories are told in different Algonquian tribes with only the identity of the protagonist differing. Napi is pronounced similar to nah-pee, and Kipitaki is pronounced similar to kih-pih-tah-kee.
Apistotoki (also spelled Apistotooki, A'pistotooki, Apistotoke, Apistotokio, and other ways.) This is the Blackfoot name for the Creator (God,) who is also known by the name Ihtsipatapiyohpa or Iihtsipaitapiiyo'pa ("Source of Life") or, in English, Great Spirit. Apistotoki is a divine spirit with no human form or attributes and is never personified in Blackfoot folklore. The name is pronounced similar to ah-piss-toh-toh-kee.
Naato'si (also spelled Natosi, Natos, Notos, Naato'siwa, Omahkaato'si, Omuqkatos, and other ways): This is the Blackfoot sun god. Some anthropologists consider him to be the same as Apistotoki, but our Blackfoot speakers are adamant that they are two different mythological figures and Naato'si, although the principal god of the Blackfoot people, was not the one who created the universe. "Naato'si" is pronounced nah-toh-see, and literally means "holy one" ("Omahkaato'si" means "great holy one"), though it is often used to refer to the sun in everyday speech as well. Naato'si is married to the Moon, Ko'komiki'somm (also spelled Ko'komiki'somma, Kokomikeis, Komorkis, and other ways) and his son is the hero Morning Star, Iipisowaahs (also Aapisowoohta, Iipisowaahsa, Apisirahts, or other names.)
Blood-Clot Boy (also known by his Blackfoot name, Katoyis or Kutoyis, which is pronounced kah-toh-yiss.) A mythical Blackfoot hero who has many adventures slaying monsters and wicked people.
Star Boy. A magical hero who is the son of a Blackfoot woman (known as Feather Woman or Soatsaki) and the immortal Morning Star. After he and his mother are banished he is known as Poia (or Poïa, or Boh-yi-yi) for a while instead, translated as "Scar-Face" in English (from the Blackfoot word payoo, "scar.") It was very common for Blackfoot people, especially boys and men, to take on new names several times in their life, so this temporary name change did not confuse Blackfoot listeners the way it confused some anthropologists!

Just some of the interesting facts: for more info go to:http://www.native-languages.org/blackfoot_culture.htm


DO YOU KNOW WHAT THE COYOTE IS SAYING TO YOU INTHIS PICTUE???
"TURN THE MUSIC DOWN, your messing with my ears", and "if you can't find him I will".

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