Taken from gazette sept 14th co. Springs USA

Letters

A permanent horrible tragedy

The NRA set the conditions for 31,328 Americans to die from guns in 2010 alone. Guns can take a momentary impulse of despair, rage or carelessness, and make it into a permanent horrible tragedy. Eighty-five Americans are shot to death every day. Fifty-three of them are suicides. More than three a day are in Colorado, more and more are by "suicide by cop," or by murder-suicides - to send a message of rage. This is like having 10 "9/11s" every year. Shouldn't our response to gun violence be 10 times that of our response to 9/11? Chemical weapons, pipe bombs, anthrax, and nuclear devices are illegal. These are tools of war and mass killings, not toys for anyone's pleasure or rages. Are assault weapons that different? The NRA says "more guns" is the answer. If more guns made us safer, we would be the safest nation in the world. Instead our homicide rate for persons age 15 to 24 is 14 times that of other industrial nations.

John Morse merely wanted to hold gunmakers liable for the damage done by their products. The tobacco industry paid billions in medical costs. BP paid billions for the Gulf Disaster. Toyota paid over a billion for accelerator problems. Those who voted to recall John Morse and Angela Giron, for caring about public health and safety, are pawns of the NRA.

For this madness to stop, we must continue to try everything to limit access to guns and increase access to mental health services. Make both mental health care and "out-of-the-home" gun storage, accessible and cheap, if not free.

Mark German, Colorado Springs

One who was given the power

As one is given power, it comes with the possibility for arrogance which if not contained can affect an elected official's relationship with those that gave them the power. John Morse is an example of one who was given the power and but failed to contain the arrogance. At least three times during his tenure in the Senate and the recall election he demonstrated his disdain for those that gave him the power. First as the Senate president he used his power to control the debate on proposed gun laws so as not to allow an opposing view to be considered. Second on a cable news network, he stated that the recall was brought about by a "disgruntled unemployed plumber." Using such a term indicates that someone in the trades and out of work has no standing, an idea which goes against the American concept of universal franchise. Third by accepting donations from a strong supporter of what has become known as the "Nanny State", Morse indicated that he was willing to move Colorado in a direction of a bigger and intrusive government. Let the recall of Morse be a notice to both sides of the political spectrum, the voters demand an open and fair legislative process, as well as a political environment in which all are respected and can participate equally, resulting in a government that has minimal influence on our day-to-day lives.

Stephen Lord, Colorado Springs

Sounds like 'free crab tomorrow'

Regarding Councilman Joel Miller's position, using the facts as represented in your Sept. 12 editorial, I think he's on the correct side of the argument.

This $82 million of funding is based on forecast of future sales tax rebates generated by the proposed projects. Hence, the projects must be built to generate revenue and sales tax. These are not "startup funds." How is this application not locking us into completion of the projects? We may not be legally locked in, but rest assured, project proponents will argue loud and long that these projects must be voter approved and completed to access the sales tax rebates.

Here's a thought: What if we apply for, and receive, these fuzzy, future sales tax rebates, approve the projects (thus incurring real bond debt), and there is little or no sales tax increase? We still have the debt, but the anticipated $82 million does not materialize. Hmm.

Councilman Miller is being fiscally responsible. This proposal looks like a smoke and mirrors attempt to get a downtown stadium. Nice try. Kinda sounds like "Free crab tomorrow."

Jack Lundberg, Colorado Springs

History can't be fixed

Enough of the labels! Being insensitive doesn't make one a racist. Especially if you are talking cross culture like Dunkin' Donuts' charcoal doughnut in Thailand and the U.S. history of stereotypes. One cannot be an accidental racist.

On another note; if people would quit living in the past and start focusing on what they are contributing to the present and the future they would find themselves on a pretty good upwards path. History cannot be fixed, the future however can be molded. The preceding message is directed at the victim mentality of minorities and nations both.

Michael S. Welsh, Colorado Springs

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