Saturday, December 28, 2013

How many Times have you heard something like this from your friend at work and you at play on th


Computer??

Gag order

gag order (also known as a gagging orderor suppression order) is an order, typically a legal order by a court or government, restricting information or comment from being made public, or in some cases, passed onto any unauthorized third party. The phrase may sometimes be used of a private order by an employer or other institution.

Gag orders may be used, for example, to keep legitimate trade secrets of a company, to protect the integrity of ongoing police or military operations, or to protect the privacy of victims or minors. Conversely, as their downside, they may be abused as a useful tool for those of financial means to intimidate witnesses and prevent release of information, using the legal system rather than other methods of intimidation. Strategic Lawsuit Against Public Participation (SLAPP) orders may potentially be abused in this way.[citation needed]

In a similar manner, a 'gag law' may limitfreedom of the press, by institutingcensorship or restricting access to information.

Hippa 

Health Information Privacy

The Office for Civil Rights enforces the HIPAA Privacy Rule, which protects the privacy of individually identifiable health information; the HIPAA Security Rule, which sets national standards for the security of electronic protected health information; the HIPAA Breach Notification Rule, which requires covered entities and business associates to provide notification following a breach of unsecured protected health information; and the confidentiality provisions of the Patient Safety Rule, which protect identifiable information being used to analyze patient safety events and improve patient safety. 

 

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) Privacy, Security and Breach Notification Rules

Learn about the Rules' protection of individually identifiable health information, the rights granted to individuals, breach notification requirements, OCR’s enforcement activities, and how to file a complaint with OCR. 
 

 

 

The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (PSQIA) Patient Safety Rule

Learn about the Patient Safety Rule's protection of confidential patient safety work product, the permitted disclosures of patient safety work product, OCR's enforcement activities, and how to file a complaint with OCR. 
      



Come get me dad !! I miss you!!!

I'm I love you so
Much! I miss you even more!!
I don't have any personal transportation . 
Please call me!!! Are you there???

Dad what are you doing in there??

Who told you?? I'm in Montgomery county?? 

Call grogans mill sheriff  officer lawless
Johnny law!! 
#3232   
In the book!!
He'll bring ya home .
 Come over dad!!
Got coffee !! Dad!!

You gonna like it.

My friends Christmas was wonderful I'll chew on it the rest of my days!!

When I was in Kansas as you know sound waves are circular with a catalysts such as steam propels sound as well heat , so gas makes sound echo, but I was working on a jalopy tailor and I had made two wooden crosses put n the windows I could almost see how it broke sound waves , now look at the Celtic cross. The gods eye hanging on our tree. Imagine hearing that sound of someone preaching broken into tiny particular , now that's the sound of the millennium. Remember the Indian movies where they would pat the mouth while making a sound breaking sound. Is breaking silence.
Jesus was hung on the cross with his back on the cross? How do we know this? How do we know anything? Unless we see it with our own eyes ? That story happens every year over and over. Are we as guilty as they were? Just by knowing this??
That's why faith is dead without works.
That is my motivation. Many men have went to hell on good intentions , idle hands are the devils play-toy.
I cannot wait to read the Kabbala , on apocrypha , haves lots to do!
I know there is a god in heAven our carnal minds cannot perceive his wonder and his greatness. He has brought me out of snags of the depth of ~ too intense to even talk about.  Remember how that phone would ring only kids could hear it ? Children hearing ? Well this make even adults vulnerable as to candy to babies, not a crash course and it consumes everything . What I sacred to god I never count not even on taxes, there will be time when we will be grateful we harkened unto gods word. And took no thought or worry as to how we will survive. 

Doing the best that we can with every dollar. 
We never let the widow go hungry. She gets what she needs and she has lots of friends here. Isn't wonderful? And they are happiest without the contingency of death
We keep it under our hats. 

And it is pretty fern kewl that she even talks to people like me!!
Listen have you not heard about the wind? And how man has learned to write upon it??
That is how I got my name. A murderer in state pen, pen pal wrote to me . And had wrote only once, murder does not seem so far fetched when you consider all your life you prepare for and I can see defense, senseless, cold , but he is not alone in his thought . Then one day u woke up and looked around myself and said they do not seem much different that say god forbid my own father. I could never convict him. Knowing him . This world is so unkind. Them scars so deep right down to the bones . 

We need more out of life than the average person. Just so we can keep the kindness flowing .
With an economy like it is? Virtual dreams. 
Is next to impossible. Lots of hard work. 

You have to look past the shoulder of this wickedness and be brave and courageous even to swallow the lump . Thing is my grandmother said, it is like chewing tobacco or a cow chewing the cudd you sit there and chew on it for a while like the gum that breath freshened liquid in it... Yes that gum was very kewl. Them things are not kewl at all and who would even chew a cudd like that for anyone?? Matter of fact it's better to chew while the cudd is living instead of dead. I hate my dad he played nasty tricks on me, crawfish sicken a head of crawfish I almost threw up! I got the eyeballs and everything!!
Dad and I in kema under the boardwalk!!  
He was a real card!! Listen he said knows about them fire crackers too!! In mo. Co. 

Did you set them firecrackers over here , come over with my horse next time I'll make a post and a watering hole. 
Bring some lime. These birds needs to eat!!

I can think of lots of things to do, you would sware by the end of the day, and hate me for chastening you to this mundane world, if we cod only visualize the blessing god has in store us. You might think its a con game, and yes I am very good at playing the game myself I was taught by the best . 
I'm sure I have suffered behind my teachers and yes the student can be better than his teacher. 
I'm am waiting for you!! To accept the gift of the spirit, there are many gifts  this year!! Some got necklaces some got key chains, some got teddy bears, some got speakers, and headlights, some got their freedom.
God bless Texas and all their beautiful saints and spirits, and god bless the Holy Ghost!!
Sent from my iPhone

Friday, December 27, 2013

New virus's confusion among emphysema patients

Coronavirus
Virus classification
Group:Group IV ((+)ssRNA)
Order:Nidovirales
Family:Coronaviridae
Subfamily:Coronavirinae
Genus:Betacoronavirus
Species:SARS coronavirus

The SARS coronavirus, sometimes shortened to SARS-CoV, is the virus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome(SARS).[1] In April 16 of 2003, following the outbreak of SARS in Asia and secondary cases elsewhere in the world, the World Health Organization (WHO) issued a press release stating that the coronavirus identified by a number of laboratories was the official cause of SARS. Samples of the virus are being held in laboratories in New YorkSan FranciscoManilaHong Kong, and Toronto.

On April 12, 2003, scientists working at theMichael Smith Genome Sciences Centre inVancouver, British Columbia finished mapping the genetic sequence of a coronavirus believed to be linked to SARS. The team was led by Dr. Marco Marra and worked in collaboration with the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control and the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg, Manitoba, using samples from infected patients in Toronto. The map, hailed by the WHO as an important step forward in fighting SARS, is shared with scientists worldwide via the GSC website (see below). Dr. Donald Lowof Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto described the discovery as having been made with "unprecedented speed."[2] The sequence of the SARS coronavirus has since been confirmed by other independent groups.

SARS

Virology

Morphology

Evolution

Symptoms and treatment

More evil to you

em·bar·go
emˈbärgō/
noun
1.
an official ban on trade or other commercial activity with a particular country.
"an embargo on grain sales"
ban, bar, prohibition, stoppage, interdict, proscription, veto, moratorium; More
historical
an order of a state forbidding foreign ships to enter, or any ships to leave, its ports.
archaic
a stoppage, prohibition, or impediment.
verb
verb: embargo; 3rd person present: embargoes; past tense: embargoed; past participle: embargoed; gerund or present participle: embargoing
1.
impose an official ban on (trade or a country or commodity).
"the country has been virtually embargoed by most of the noncommunist world"
officially ban the publication of.
3rd person present: embargos
"documents of national security importance are routinely embargoed"
synonyms: ban, bar, prohibit, stop, interdict, debar, proscribe, outlaw; More
antonyms: allow
2.
archaic
seize (a ship or goods) for state service.
Origin

More
early 17th cent.: from Spanish, from embargar ‘arrest,’ based on Latin in- ‘in, within’ + barra ‘a bar.’
Translate embargo to
Use over time for: embargo


http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/15
STATUS MESSAGE There are 156 Updates Pending. Select the tab below to view.
U.S. CODE: TITLE 15 - COMMERCE AND TRADE

STATUS MESSAGE There are 156 Updates Pending. Select the tab below to view.
US Code
Notes
Updates
PREV | NEXT
Current through Pub. L. 113-52. (See Public Laws for the current Congress.)

CHAPTER 1—MONOPOLIES AND COMBINATIONS IN RESTRAINT OF TRADE (§§ 1–38)
CHAPTER 2—FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION; PROMOTION OF EXPORT TRADE AND PREVENTION OF UNFAIR METHODS OF COMPETITION (§§ 41–77)
CHAPTER 2A—SECURITIES AND TRUST INDENTURES (§§ 77a–77bbbb)
CHAPTER 2B—SECURITIES EXCHANGES (§§ 78a–78pp)
CHAPTER 2B-1—SECURITIES INVESTOR PROTECTION (§§ 78aaa–78lll)
CHAPTER 2C—PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANIES (§ 79_to_79z6)
CHAPTER 2D—INVESTMENT COMPANIES AND ADVISERS (§§ 80a1–80b21)
CHAPTER 2E—OMNIBUS SMALL BUSINESS CAPITAL FORMATION (§§ 80c–80c3)
CHAPTER 3—TRADE-MARKS (§ 81_to_134)
CHAPTER 4—CHINA TRADE (§§ 141–162)
CHAPTER 5—STATISTICAL AND COMMERCIAL INFORMATION (§§ 171–198)
CHAPTER 6—WEIGHTS AND MEASURES AND STANDARD TIME (§§ 201–267)
CHAPTER 7—NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY (§§ 271–285,_286)
CHAPTER 7A—STANDARD REFERENCE DATA PROGRAM (§§ 290–290f)
CHAPTER 8—FALSELY STAMPED GOLD OR SILVER OR GOODS MANUFACTURED THEREFROM (§§ 291–300)
CHAPTER 9—NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE (§§ 311–329)
CHAPTER 9A—WEATHER MODIFICATION ACTIVITIES OR ATTEMPTS; REPORTING REQUIREMENT (§§ 330–330e)
CHAPTER 10—WAR FINANCE CORPORATION (§ 331_to_374)
CHAPTER 10A—COLLECTION OF STATE CIGARETTE TAXES (§§ 375–378)
CHAPTER 10B—STATE TAXATION OF INCOME FROM INTERSTATE COMMERCE (§§ 381–391)
CHAPTER 11—CAUSTIC POISONS (§ 401_to_411)
CHAPTER 12—DISCRIMINATION AGAINST FARMERS COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATIONS BY BOARDS OF TRADE (§§ 431–433)
CHAPTER 13—TEXTILE FOUNDATION (§§ 501–506)
CHAPTER 13A—FISHING INDUSTRY (§§ 521–522)
CHAPTER 14—RECONSTRUCTION FINANCE CORPORATION (§§ 601_to_616–617_to_619)
CHAPTER 14A—AID TO SMALL BUSINESS (§§ 631–657s)
CHAPTER 14B—SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT PROGRAM (§§ 661–697g)
CHAPTER 15—ECONOMIC RECOVERY (§§ 701–714p)
CHAPTER 15A—INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF PETROLEUM PRODUCTS (§§ 715–715m)
CHAPTER 15B—NATURAL GAS (§§ 717–717z)
CHAPTER 15C—ALASKA NATURAL GAS TRANSPORTATION (§§ 719–719o)
CHAPTER 15D—ALASKA NATURAL GAS PIPELINE (§§ 720–720n)
CHAPTER 16—EMERGENCY RELIEF (§§ 721,_722–724_to_728)
CHAPTER 16A—EMERGENCY PETROLEUM ALLOCATION (§ 751_to_760h)
CHAPTER 16B—FEDERAL ENERGY ADMINISTRATION (§§ 761–790h)
CHAPTER 16C—ENERGY SUPPLY AND ENVIRONMENTAL COORDINATION (§§ 791–798)
CHAPTER 17—PRODUCTION, MARKETING, AND USE OF BITUMINOUS COAL (§§ 801_to_827–828_to_852)
CHAPTER 18—TRANSPORTATION OF FIREARMS (§ 901_to_910)
CHAPTER 19—MISCELLANEOUS (§§ 1001–1007)
CHAPTER 20—REGULATION OF INSURANCE (§§ 1011–1015)
CHAPTER 21—NATIONAL POLICY ON EMPLOYMENT AND PRODUCTIVITY (§§ 1021–1026)
CHAPTER 22—TRADEMARKS (§§ 1051–1141n)
CHAPTER 23—DISSEMINATION OF TECHNICAL, SCIENTIFIC AND ENGINEERING INFORMATION (§§ 1151–1157)
CHAPTER 24—TRANSPORTATION OF GAMBLING DEVICES (§§ 1171–1178)
CHAPTER 25—FLAMMABLE FABRICS (§§ 1191–1204)
CHAPTER 26—HOUSEHOLD REFRIGERATORS (§§ 1211–1214)
CHAPTER 27—AUTOMOBILE DEALER SUITS AGAINST MANUFACTURERS (§§ 1221–1226)
CHAPTER 28—DISCLOSURE OF AUTOMOBILE INFORMATION (§§ 1231–1233)
CHAPTER 29—MANUFACTURE, TRANSPORTATION, OR DISTRIBUTION OF SWITCHBLADE KNIVES (§§ 1241–1245)
CHAPTER 30—HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES (§§ 1261–1278a)
CHAPTER 31—DESTRUCTION OF PROPERTY MOVING IN COMMERCE (§ 1281,_1282)
CHAPTER 32—TELECASTING OF PROFESSIONAL SPORTS CONTESTS (§§ 1291–1295)
CHAPTER 33—BRAKE FLUID REGULATION (§ 1301_to_1303)
CHAPTER 34—ANTITRUST CIVIL PROCESS (§§ 1311–1314)
CHAPTER 35—SEAT BELT REGULATION (§ 1321_to_1323)
CHAPTER 36—CIGARETTE LABELING AND ADVERTISING (§§ 1331–1341)
CHAPTER 37—STATE TECHNICAL SERVICES (§§ 1351–1368)
CHAPTER 38—TRAFFIC AND MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY (§§ 1381–1431)
CHAPTER 39—FAIR PACKAGING AND LABELING PROGRAM (§§ 1451–1461)
CHAPTER 39A—SPECIAL PACKAGING OF HOUSEHOLD SUBSTANCES FOR PROTECTION OF CHILDREN (§§ 1471–1477)
CHAPTER 40—DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (§§ 1501–1543)
CHAPTER 41—CONSUMER CREDIT PROTECTION (§§ 1601–1693r)
CHAPTER 42—INTERSTATE LAND SALES (§§ 1701–1720)
CHAPTER 43—NEWSPAPER PRESERVATION (§§ 1801–1804)
CHAPTER 44—PROTECTION OF HORSES (§§ 1821–1831)
CHAPTER 45—EMERGENCY LOAN GUARANTEES TO BUSINESS ENTERPRISES (§§ 1841–1852)
CHAPTER 45A—CHRYSLER CORPORATION LOAN GUARANTEE (§ 1861_to_1875)
CHAPTER 46—MOTOR VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST SAVINGS (§§ 1901–2021_to_2034)
CHAPTER 46A—AUTOMOBILE TITLE FRAUD (§ 2041_to_2044)
CHAPTER 47—CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY (§§ 2051–2089)
CHAPTER 48—HOBBY PROTECTION (§§ 2101–2106)
CHAPTER 49—FIRE PREVENTION AND CONTROL (§§ 2201–2234)
CHAPTER 50—CONSUMER PRODUCT WARRANTIES (§§ 2301–2312)
CHAPTER 51—NATIONAL PRODUCTIVITY AND QUALITY OF WORKING LIFE (§§ 2401–2471)
CHAPTER 52—ELECTRIC AND HYBRID VEHICLE RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND DEMONSTRATION (§§ 2501–2514)
CHAPTER 53—TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL (§§ 2601–2697)
CHAPTER 54—AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT (§§ 2701–2710)
CHAPTER 55—PETROLEUM MARKETING PRACTICES (§§ 2801–2841)
CHAPTER 56—NATIONAL CLIMATE PROGRAM (§§ 2901–2908)
CHAPTER 56A—GLOBAL CHANGE RESEARCH (§§ 2921–2961)
CHAPTER 57—INTERSTATE HORSERACING (§§ 3001–3007)
CHAPTER 58—FULL EMPLOYMENT AND BALANCED GROWTH (§§ 3101–3152)
CHAPTER 59—RETAIL POLICIES FOR NATURAL GAS UTILITIES (§§ 3201–3211)
CHAPTER 60—NATURAL GAS POLICY (§§ 3301–3432)
CHAPTER 61—SOFT DRINK INTERBRAND COMPETITION (§§ 3501–3503)
CHAPTER 62—CONDOMINIUM AND COOPERATIVE CONVERSION PROTECTION AND ABUSE RELIEF (§§ 3601–3616)
CHAPTER 63—TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION (§§ 3701–3722)
CHAPTER 64—METHANE TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND DEMONSTRATION (§§ 3801–3810)
CHAPTER 65—LIABILITY RISK RETENTION (§§ 3901–3906)
CHAPTER 66—PROMOTION OF EXPORT TRADE (§§ 4001–4053)
CHAPTER 67—ARCTIC RESEARCH AND POLICY (§§ 4101–4111)
CHAPTER 68—LAND REMOTE-SENSING COMMERCIALIZATION (§§ 4201_to_4204–4291,_4292)
CHAPTER 69—COOPERATIVE RESEARCH (§§ 4301–4306)
CHAPTER 70—COMPREHENSIVE SMOKELESS TOBACCO HEALTH EDUCATION (§§ 4401–4408)
CHAPTER 71—PETROLEUM OVERCHARGE DISTRIBUTION AND RESTITUTION (§§ 4501–4507)
CHAPTER 72—SEMICONDUCTOR RESEARCH (§§ 4601–4632)
CHAPTER 73—EXPORT ENHANCEMENT (§§ 4701_to_4704–4729)
CHAPTER 74—COMPETITIVENESS POLICY COUNCIL (§§ 4801–4809)
CHAPTER 75—NATIONAL TRADE DATA BANK (§§ 4901–4913)
CHAPTER 76—IMITATION FIREARMS (§ 5001)
CHAPTER 77—STEEL AND ALUMINUM ENERGY CONSERVATION AND TECHNOLOGY COMPETITIVENESS (§§ 5101–5110)
CHAPTER 78—SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND COMPETITIVENESS (§§ 5201–5209)
CHAPTER 79—METAL CASTING COMPETITIVENESS RESEARCH PROGRAM (§§ 5301–5309)
CHAPTER 80—FASTENERS (§§ 5401–5414)
CHAPTER 81—HIGH-PERFORMANCE COMPUTING (§§ 5501–5543)
CHAPTER 82—LAND REMOTE SENSING POLICY (§§ 5601–5671,_5672)
CHAPTER 83—TELEPHONE DISCLOSURE AND DISPUTE RESOLUTION (§§ 5701–5724)
CHAPTER 84—COMMERCIAL SPACE COMPETITIVENESS (§§ 5801–5805_to_5808)
CHAPTER 85—ARMORED CAR INDUSTRY RECIPROCITY (§§ 5901–5904)
CHAPTER 86—CHILDRENS BICYCLE HELMET SAFETY (§§ 6001–6006)
CHAPTER 87—TELEMARKETING AND CONSUMER FRAUD AND ABUSE PREVENTION (§§ 6101–6108)
CHAPTER 87A—NATIONAL DO-NOT-CALL REGISTRY (§§ 6151–6155)
CHAPTER 88—INTERNATIONAL ANTITRUST ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE (§§ 6201–6212)
CHAPTER 89—PROFESSIONAL BOXING SAFETY (§§ 6301–6313)
CHAPTER 90—PROPANE EDUCATION AND RESEARCH (§§ 6401–6411)
CHAPTER 91—CHILDRENS ONLINE PRIVACY PROTECTION (§§ 6501–6506)
CHAPTER 91A—PROMOTING A SAFE INTERNET FOR CHILDREN (§§ 6551–6555)
CHAPTER 92—YEAR 2000 COMPUTER DATE CHANGE (§§ 6601–6617)
CHAPTER 93—INSURANCE (§§ 6701–6781)
CHAPTER 94—PRIVACY (§§ 6801–6827)
CHAPTER 95—MICROENTERPRISE TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE AND CAPACITY BUILDING PROGRAM (§§ 6901–6910)
CHAPTER 96—ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES IN GLOBAL AND NATIONAL COMMERCE (§§ 7001–7031)
CHAPTER 97—WOMENS BUSINESS ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT (§§ 7101–7110)
CHAPTER 98—PUBLIC COMPANY ACCOUNTING REFORM AND CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY (§§ 7201–7266)
CHAPTER 99—NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TEAM (§§ 7301–7313)
CHAPTER 100—CYBER SECURITY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT (§§ 7401–7411)
CHAPTER 101—NANOTECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT (§§ 7501–7509)
CHAPTER 102—FAIRNESS TO CONTACT LENS CONSUMERS (§§ 7601–7610)
CHAPTER 103—CONTROLLING THE ASSAULT OF NON-SOLICITED PORNOGRAPHY AND MARKETING (§§ 7701–7713)
CHAPTER 104—SPORTS AGENT RESPONSIBILITY AND TRUST (§§ 7801–7807)
CHAPTER 105—PROTECTION OF LAWFUL COMMERCE IN ARMS (§§ 7901–7903)
CHAPTER 106—POOL AND SPA SAFETY (§§ 8001–8008)
(More in this at website)

The was a tex mex trade embargo, which directly effected the border of Mexico South America .

United States embargo against Cuba
This page has some issues
The United States embargo against Cuba is a commercial, economic, and financial embargo partially imposed on Cuba in October 1960 (almost two years after the Batista regime was deposed by the Cuban Revolution). It was enacted after Cuba nationalized the properties of United States citizens and corporations and it was strengthened to a near-total embargo on February 7, 1962.[1]

Titled the Cuban Democracy Act, the embargo was codified into law in 1993 with the stated purpose of maintaining sanctions on Cuba so long as the Cuban government continues to refuse to move toward "democratization and greater respect for human rights."[2] In 1996, Congress passed the Helms–Burton Act, which further restricted United States citizens from doing business in or with Cuba, and mandated restrictions on giving public or private assistance to any successor government in Havana unless and until certain claims against the Cuban government are met. In 1999, U.S. President Bill Clinton expanded the trade embargo even further by also disallowing foreign subsidiaries of U.S. companies to trade with Cuba. In 2000, Clinton authorized the sale of certain "humanitarian" US products to Cuba.

The English word 'embargo' is dubbed by its opponents in Cuba and Latin America as el bloqueo, despite the fact that the word 'embargo' exists in Spanish, with an identical meaning in this context.[3] The term 'bloqueo' (Spanish for "the blockade") suggests the presence of a physical blockade by the US Government. Despite this implication, no such blockade exists.[4] The USA does not block Cuba's trade with third-party countries: other countries are not under the jurisdiction of US domestic laws, such as the Cuban Democracy Act (although, in theory, foreign countries that trade with Cuba could be penalised by the US, which has been condemned as an "extraterritorial" measure that contravenes "the sovereign equality of States, non-intervention in their internal affairs and freedom of trade and navigation as paramount to the conduct of international affairs."[5]). Cuba can, and does, conduct international trade with many third-party countries;[6] Cuba has been a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO) since 1995.[7] Rationing and shortages[8] of food and consumer goods exist in Cuba, but it is possible that the Cuban economy may have been "throttled" by "collectivist central planning",[9] rather than by the embargo. In 2011, the US Government's UN Representative stated that the "Cuban Government’s own policy was the largest obstacle to the country’s own development, concentrating political and economic decisions in the hands of the few and stifling economic growth", and that "The United States was, in fact, a leading source of food and humanitarian aid to Cuba." The embargo has been periodically debated and criticised for over 20 years in UN General Assembly votes.[5]

President Barack Obama has outlined a series of steps that Cuba could take to demonstrate a willingness to open its closed society, including releasing political prisoners, allowing United States telecommunications companies to operate on the island and ending government fees on U.S. dollars sent by relatives in the United States. In confirmation hearings for the position of Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton said that she believed that the ban on Cuban-American family travel should be lifted.[10] Many saw this as an opportunity for Cubans and Americans to engage in viable businesses together.[11] The process toward larger diplomatic and commercial openings with Cuba was derailed when Cuban authorities arrested USAID contractor Alan Gross in December 2009, sentencing him to 15 years in prison in 2011. While maintaining limited economic exchanges with Cuba, President Obama stated that, without improved human rights and freedoms by Cuba, the embargo remains "in the national interest of the United States."[12] As of November 2011, U.S.–Cuba relations remain frozen and Cuba also remains one of the four countries in the world designated as a State Sponsor of Terrorism by the United States Department of State [13]

Beyond Cuba's human rights violations and its state sponsored terrorism designation, the United States holds $6 billion worth of financial claims against the Cuban government.[14] The Cuban-American position is that the U. S. embargo is, in part, an appropriate response to these unaddressed claims.[15] The Latin America Working Group argues that pro-embargo Cuban-American exiles, whose votes are crucial in Florida, have swayed many politicians to also adopt similar views.[16] The Cuban-American views have been opposed by some business leaders who argue that trading freely would be good for Cuba and the United States.[17]

At present, the embargo, which limits American businesses from conducting business with Cuban interests, is still in effect and is the most enduring trade embargo in modern history. Despite the existence of the embargo, the United States is the fifth largest exporter to Cuba (6.6% of Cuba's imports are from the US).[18] However, Cuba must pay cash for all imports, as credit is not allowed.[19]

History
Details of embargo
Socio-Economic Effects of the embargo
Critiques of embargo laws and rules
2010 Bill to end the travel ban
Polling data and public opinion
See also
References
External links

Comments:
If the embargo is not lifted there will no legal trades for marijuana or anything else from South America . 

The product must be locally grown and or imported from Europe instead of South America.

Trade embargoes may also effect relations with Europe due to wars . Economic problem due to tax and retail markup. 

That is New York ports. 

Permits must be available on all imports transported by vehicle. 
Have to have stamps similar to cigarette tax stamps but not to breech or mimic patten of the tobacco industry. 

This is just the beginning. 

Help Texas today

em·bar·go
emˈbärgō/
noun
1.
an official ban on trade or other commercial activity with a particular country.
"an embargo on grain sales"
ban, bar, prohibition, stoppage, interdict, proscription, veto, moratorium; More
historical
an order of a state forbidding foreign ships to enter, or any ships to leave, its ports.
archaic
a stoppage, prohibition, or impediment.
verb
verb: embargo; 3rd person present: embargoes; past tense: embargoed; past participle: embargoed; gerund or present participle: embargoing
1.
impose an official ban on (trade or a country or commodity).
"the country has been virtually embargoed by most of the noncommunist world"
officially ban the publication of.
3rd person present: embargos
"documents of national security importance are routinely embargoed"
synonyms:    ban, bar, prohibit, stop, interdict, debar, proscribe, outlaw; More
antonyms:    allow
2.
archaic
seize (a ship or goods) for state service.
Origin

More
early 17th cent.: from Spanish, from embargar ‘arrest,’ based on Latin in- ‘in, within’ + barra ‘a bar.’
Translate embargo to
Use over time for: embargo


http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/15
STATUS MESSAGE There are 156 Updates Pending. Select the tab below to view.
U.S. CODE: TITLE 15 - COMMERCE AND TRADE

STATUS MESSAGE There are 156 Updates Pending. Select the tab below to view.
US Code
Notes
Updates
PREV | NEXT
Current through Pub. L. 113-52. (See Public Laws for the current Congress.)

CHAPTER 1—MONOPOLIES AND COMBINATIONS IN RESTRAINT OF TRADE (§§ 1–38)
CHAPTER 2—FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION; PROMOTION OF EXPORT TRADE AND PREVENTION OF UNFAIR METHODS OF COMPETITION (§§ 41–77)
CHAPTER 2A—SECURITIES AND TRUST INDENTURES (§§ 77a–77bbbb)
CHAPTER 2B—SECURITIES EXCHANGES (§§ 78a–78pp)
CHAPTER 2B-1—SECURITIES INVESTOR PROTECTION (§§ 78aaa–78lll)
CHAPTER 2C—PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANIES (§ 79_to_79z6)
CHAPTER 2D—INVESTMENT COMPANIES AND ADVISERS (§§ 80a1–80b21)
CHAPTER 2E—OMNIBUS SMALL BUSINESS CAPITAL FORMATION (§§ 80c–80c3)
CHAPTER 3—TRADE-MARKS (§ 81_to_134)
CHAPTER 4—CHINA TRADE (§§ 141–162)
CHAPTER 5—STATISTICAL AND COMMERCIAL INFORMATION (§§ 171–198)
CHAPTER 6—WEIGHTS AND MEASURES AND STANDARD TIME (§§ 201–267)
CHAPTER 7—NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY (§§ 271–285,_286)
CHAPTER 7A—STANDARD REFERENCE DATA PROGRAM (§§ 290–290f)
CHAPTER 8—FALSELY STAMPED GOLD OR SILVER OR GOODS MANUFACTURED THEREFROM (§§ 291–300)
CHAPTER 9—NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE (§§ 311–329)
CHAPTER 9A—WEATHER MODIFICATION ACTIVITIES OR ATTEMPTS; REPORTING REQUIREMENT (§§ 330–330e)
CHAPTER 10—WAR FINANCE CORPORATION (§ 331_to_374)
CHAPTER 10A—COLLECTION OF STATE CIGARETTE TAXES (§§ 375–378)
CHAPTER 10B—STATE TAXATION OF INCOME FROM INTERSTATE COMMERCE (§§ 381–391)
CHAPTER 11—CAUSTIC POISONS (§ 401_to_411)
CHAPTER 12—DISCRIMINATION AGAINST FARMERS COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATIONS BY BOARDS OF TRADE (§§ 431–433)
CHAPTER 13—TEXTILE FOUNDATION (§§ 501–506)
CHAPTER 13A—FISHING INDUSTRY (§§ 521–522)
CHAPTER 14—RECONSTRUCTION FINANCE CORPORATION (§§ 601_to_616–617_to_619)
CHAPTER 14A—AID TO SMALL BUSINESS (§§ 631–657s)
CHAPTER 14B—SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT PROGRAM (§§ 661–697g)
CHAPTER 15—ECONOMIC RECOVERY (§§ 701–714p)
CHAPTER 15A—INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF PETROLEUM PRODUCTS (§§ 715–715m)
CHAPTER 15B—NATURAL GAS (§§ 717–717z)
CHAPTER 15C—ALASKA NATURAL GAS TRANSPORTATION (§§ 719–719o)
CHAPTER 15D—ALASKA NATURAL GAS PIPELINE (§§ 720–720n)
CHAPTER 16—EMERGENCY RELIEF (§§ 721,_722–724_to_728)
CHAPTER 16A—EMERGENCY PETROLEUM ALLOCATION (§ 751_to_760h)
CHAPTER 16B—FEDERAL ENERGY ADMINISTRATION (§§ 761–790h)
CHAPTER 16C—ENERGY SUPPLY AND ENVIRONMENTAL COORDINATION (§§ 791–798)
CHAPTER 17—PRODUCTION, MARKETING, AND USE OF BITUMINOUS COAL (§§ 801_to_827–828_to_852)
CHAPTER 18—TRANSPORTATION OF FIREARMS (§ 901_to_910)
CHAPTER 19—MISCELLANEOUS (§§ 1001–1007)
CHAPTER 20—REGULATION OF INSURANCE (§§ 1011–1015)
CHAPTER 21—NATIONAL POLICY ON EMPLOYMENT AND PRODUCTIVITY (§§ 1021–1026)
CHAPTER 22—TRADEMARKS (§§ 1051–1141n)
CHAPTER 23—DISSEMINATION OF TECHNICAL, SCIENTIFIC AND ENGINEERING INFORMATION (§§ 1151–1157)
CHAPTER 24—TRANSPORTATION OF GAMBLING DEVICES (§§ 1171–1178)
CHAPTER 25—FLAMMABLE FABRICS (§§ 1191–1204)
CHAPTER 26—HOUSEHOLD REFRIGERATORS (§§ 1211–1214)
CHAPTER 27—AUTOMOBILE DEALER SUITS AGAINST MANUFACTURERS (§§ 1221–1226)
CHAPTER 28—DISCLOSURE OF AUTOMOBILE INFORMATION (§§ 1231–1233)
CHAPTER 29—MANUFACTURE, TRANSPORTATION, OR DISTRIBUTION OF SWITCHBLADE KNIVES (§§ 1241–1245)
CHAPTER 30—HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES (§§ 1261–1278a)
CHAPTER 31—DESTRUCTION OF PROPERTY MOVING IN COMMERCE (§ 1281,_1282)
CHAPTER 32—TELECASTING OF PROFESSIONAL SPORTS CONTESTS (§§ 1291–1295)
CHAPTER 33—BRAKE FLUID REGULATION (§ 1301_to_1303)
CHAPTER 34—ANTITRUST CIVIL PROCESS (§§ 1311–1314)
CHAPTER 35—SEAT BELT REGULATION (§ 1321_to_1323)
CHAPTER 36—CIGARETTE LABELING AND ADVERTISING (§§ 1331–1341)
CHAPTER 37—STATE TECHNICAL SERVICES (§§ 1351–1368)
CHAPTER 38—TRAFFIC AND MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY (§§ 1381–1431)
CHAPTER 39—FAIR PACKAGING AND LABELING PROGRAM (§§ 1451–1461)
CHAPTER 39A—SPECIAL PACKAGING OF HOUSEHOLD SUBSTANCES FOR PROTECTION OF CHILDREN (§§ 1471–1477)
CHAPTER 40—DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (§§ 1501–1543)
CHAPTER 41—CONSUMER CREDIT PROTECTION (§§ 1601–1693r)
CHAPTER 42—INTERSTATE LAND SALES (§§ 1701–1720)
CHAPTER 43—NEWSPAPER PRESERVATION (§§ 1801–1804)
CHAPTER 44—PROTECTION OF HORSES (§§ 1821–1831)
CHAPTER 45—EMERGENCY LOAN GUARANTEES TO BUSINESS ENTERPRISES (§§ 1841–1852)
CHAPTER 45A—CHRYSLER CORPORATION LOAN GUARANTEE (§ 1861_to_1875)
CHAPTER 46—MOTOR VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST SAVINGS (§§ 1901–2021_to_2034)
CHAPTER 46A—AUTOMOBILE TITLE FRAUD (§ 2041_to_2044)
CHAPTER 47—CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY (§§ 2051–2089)
CHAPTER 48—HOBBY PROTECTION (§§ 2101–2106)
CHAPTER 49—FIRE PREVENTION AND CONTROL (§§2201–2234)
CHAPTER 50—CONSUMER PRODUCT WARRANTIES (§§2301–2312)
CHAPTER 51—NATIONAL PRODUCTIVITY AND QUALITY OF WORKING LIFE (§§ 2401–2471)
CHAPTER 52—ELECTRIC AND HYBRID VEHICLE RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND DEMONSTRATION (§§ 2501–2514)
CHAPTER 53—TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL (§§2601–2697)
CHAPTER 54—AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT (§§ 2701–2710)
CHAPTER 55—PETROLEUM MARKETING PRACTICES (§§2801–2841)
CHAPTER 56—NATIONAL CLIMATE PROGRAM (§§ 2901–2908)
CHAPTER 56A—GLOBAL CHANGE RESEARCH (§§ 2921–2961)
CHAPTER 57—INTERSTATE HORSERACING (§§ 3001–3007)
CHAPTER 58—FULL EMPLOYMENT AND BALANCED GROWTH (§§ 3101–3152)
CHAPTER 59—RETAIL POLICIES FOR NATURAL GAS UTILITIES (§§ 3201–3211)
CHAPTER 60—NATURAL GAS POLICY (§§ 3301–3432)
CHAPTER 61—SOFT DRINK INTERBRAND COMPETITION (§§3501–3503)
CHAPTER 62—CONDOMINIUM AND COOPERATIVE CONVERSION PROTECTION AND ABUSE RELIEF (§§ 3601–3616)
CHAPTER 63—TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION (§§ 3701–3722)
CHAPTER 64—METHANE TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND DEMONSTRATION (§§ 3801–3810)
CHAPTER 65—LIABILITY RISK RETENTION (§§ 3901–3906)
CHAPTER 66—PROMOTION OF EXPORT TRADE (§§ 4001–4053)
CHAPTER 67—ARCTIC RESEARCH AND POLICY (§§4101–4111)
CHAPTER 68—LAND REMOTE-SENSING COMMERCIALIZATION (§§ 4201_to_4204–4291,_4292)
CHAPTER 69—COOPERATIVE RESEARCH (§§ 4301–4306)
CHAPTER 70—COMPREHENSIVE SMOKELESS TOBACCO HEALTH EDUCATION (§§ 4401–4408)
CHAPTER 71—PETROLEUM OVERCHARGE DISTRIBUTION AND RESTITUTION (§§ 4501–4507)
CHAPTER 72—SEMICONDUCTOR RESEARCH (§§ 4601–4632)
CHAPTER 73—EXPORT ENHANCEMENT (§§ 4701_to_4704–4729)
CHAPTER 74—COMPETITIVENESS POLICY COUNCIL (§§ 4801–4809)
CHAPTER 75—NATIONAL TRADE DATA BANK (§§ 4901–4913)
CHAPTER 76—IMITATION FIREARMS (§ 5001)
CHAPTER 77—STEEL AND ALUMINUM ENERGY CONSERVATION AND TECHNOLOGY COMPETITIVENESS (§§ 5101–5110)
CHAPTER 78—SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND COMPETITIVENESS (§§ 5201–5209)
CHAPTER 79—METAL CASTING COMPETITIVENESS RESEARCH PROGRAM (§§ 5301–5309)
CHAPTER 80—FASTENERS (§§5401–5414)
CHAPTER 81—HIGH-PERFORMANCE COMPUTING (§§ 5501–5543)
CHAPTER 82—LAND REMOTE SENSING POLICY (§§ 5601–5671,_5672)
CHAPTER 83—TELEPHONE DISCLOSURE AND DISPUTE RESOLUTION (§§ 5701–5724)
CHAPTER 84—COMMERCIAL SPACE COMPETITIVENESS (§§5801–5805_to_5808)
CHAPTER 85—ARMORED CAR INDUSTRY RECIPROCITY (§§5901–5904)
CHAPTER 86—CHILDRENS BICYCLE HELMET SAFETY (§§6001–6006)
CHAPTER 87—TELEMARKETING AND CONSUMER FRAUD AND ABUSE PREVENTION (§§ 6101–6108)
CHAPTER 87A—NATIONAL DO-NOT-CALL REGISTRY (§§ 6151–6155)
CHAPTER 88—INTERNATIONAL ANTITRUST ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE (§§ 6201–6212)
CHAPTER 89—PROFESSIONAL BOXING SAFETY (§§ 6301–6313)
CHAPTER 90—PROPANE EDUCATION AND RESEARCH (§§6401–6411)
CHAPTER 91—CHILDRENS ONLINE PRIVACY PROTECTION (§§ 6501–6506)
CHAPTER 91A—PROMOTING A SAFE INTERNET FOR CHILDREN (§§ 6551–6555)
CHAPTER 92—YEAR 2000 COMPUTER DATE CHANGE (§§6601–6617)
CHAPTER 93—INSURANCE (§§6701–6781)
CHAPTER 94—PRIVACY (§§6801–6827)
CHAPTER 95—MICROENTERPRISE TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE AND CAPACITY BUILDING PROGRAM (§§ 6901–6910)
CHAPTER 96—ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES IN GLOBAL AND NATIONAL COMMERCE (§§7001–7031)
CHAPTER 97—WOMENS BUSINESS ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT (§§ 7101–7110)
CHAPTER 98—PUBLIC COMPANY ACCOUNTING REFORM AND CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY (§§ 7201–7266)
CHAPTER 99—NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TEAM (§§ 7301–7313)
CHAPTER 100—CYBER SECURITY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT (§§ 7401–7411)
CHAPTER 101—NANOTECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT (§§ 7501–7509)
CHAPTER 102—FAIRNESS TO CONTACT LENS CONSUMERS (§§ 7601–7610)
CHAPTER 103—CONTROLLING THE ASSAULT OF NON-SOLICITED PORNOGRAPHY AND MARKETING (§§ 7701–7713)
CHAPTER 104—SPORTS AGENT RESPONSIBILITY AND TRUST (§§ 7801–7807)
CHAPTER 105—PROTECTION OF LAWFUL COMMERCE IN ARMS (§§ 7901–7903)
CHAPTER 106—POOL AND SPA SAFETY (§§ 8001–8008)
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The was a tex mex trade embargo, which directly effected the border of Mexico South America .

United States embargo against Cuba
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The United States embargo against Cuba is a commercial, economic, and financial embargo partially imposed on Cuba in October 1960 (almost two years after the Batista regime was deposed by the Cuban Revolution). It was enacted after Cuba nationalized the properties of United States citizens and corporations and it was strengthened to a near-total embargo on February 7, 1962.[1]

Titled the Cuban Democracy Act, the embargo was codified into law in 1993 with the stated purpose of maintaining sanctions on Cuba so long as the Cuban government continues to refuse to move toward "democratization and greater respect for human rights."[2] In 1996, Congress passed the Helms–Burton Act, which further restricted United States citizens from doing business in or with Cuba, and mandated restrictions on giving public or private assistance to any successor government in Havana unless and until certain claims against the Cuban government are met. In 1999, U.S. President Bill Clinton expanded the trade embargo even further by also disallowing foreign subsidiaries of U.S. companies to trade with Cuba. In 2000, Clinton authorized the sale of certain "humanitarian" US products to Cuba.

The English word 'embargo' is dubbed by its opponents in Cuba and Latin America as el bloqueo, despite the fact that the word 'embargo' exists in Spanish, with an identical meaning in this context.[3] The term 'bloqueo' (Spanish for "the blockade") suggests the presence of a physical blockade by the US Government. Despite this implication, no such blockade exists.[4] The USA does not block Cuba's trade with third-party countries: other countries are not under the jurisdiction of US domestic laws, such as the Cuban Democracy Act (although, in theory, foreign countries that trade with Cuba could be penalised by the US, which has been condemned as an "extraterritorial" measure that contravenes "the sovereign equality of States, non-intervention in their internal affairs and freedom of trade and navigation as paramount to the conduct of international affairs."[5]). Cuba can, and does, conduct international trade with many third-party countries;[6] Cuba has been a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO) since 1995.[7] Rationing and shortages[8] of food and consumer goods exist in Cuba, but it is possible that the Cuban economy may have been "throttled" by "collectivist central planning",[9] rather than by the embargo. In 2011, the US Government's UN Representative stated that the "Cuban Government’s own policy was the largest obstacle to the country’s own development, concentrating political and economic decisions in the hands of the few and stifling economic growth", and that "The United States was, in fact, a leading source of food and humanitarian aid to Cuba." The embargo has been periodically debated and criticised for over 20 years in UN General Assembly votes.[5]

President Barack Obama has outlined a series of steps that Cuba could take to demonstrate a willingness to open its closed society, including releasing political prisoners, allowing United States telecommunications companies to operate on the island and ending government fees on U.S. dollars sent by relatives in the United States. In confirmation hearings for the position of Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton said that she believed that the ban on Cuban-American family travel should be lifted.[10] Many saw this as an opportunity for Cubans and Americans to engage in viable businesses together.[11] The process toward larger diplomatic and commercial openings with Cuba was derailed when Cuban authorities arrested USAID contractor Alan Gross in December 2009, sentencing him to 15 years in prison in 2011. While maintaining limited economic exchanges with Cuba, President Obama stated that, without improved human rights and freedoms by Cuba, the embargo remains "in the national interest of the United States."[12] As of November 2011, U.S.–Cuba relations remain frozen and Cuba also remains one of the four countries in the world designated as a State Sponsor of Terrorism by the United States Department of State [13]

Beyond Cuba's human rights violations and its state sponsored terrorism designation, the United States holds $6 billion worth of financial claims against the Cuban government.[14] The Cuban-American position is that the U. S. embargo is, in part, an appropriate response to these unaddressed claims.[15] The Latin America Working Group argues that pro-embargo Cuban-American exiles, whose votes are crucial in Florida, have swayed many politicians to also adopt similar views.[16] The Cuban-American views have been opposed by some business leaders who argue that trading freely would be good for Cuba and the United States.[17]

At present, the embargo, which limits American businesses from conducting business with Cuban interests, is still in effect and is the most enduring trade embargo in modern history. Despite the existence of the embargo, the United States is the fifth largest exporter to Cuba (6.6% of Cuba's imports are from the US).[18] However, Cuba must pay cash for all imports, as credit is not allowed.[19]

History
Details of embargo
Socio-Economic Effects of the embargo
Critiques of embargo laws and rules
2010 Bill to end the travel ban
Polling data and public opinion
See also
References
External links

Comments:
If the embargo is not lifted there will no legal trades for marijuana or anything else from South America . 

The product must be locally grown and or imported from Europe instead of South America.

Trade embargoes may also effect relations with Europe due to wars . Economic problem due to tax and retail markup. 

That is New York ports. 

Permits must be available on all imports transported by vehicle. 
Have to have stamps similar to cigarette tax stamps but not to breech or mimic patten of the tobacco industry. 

This is just the beginning. 




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