Organized crime racketeering

Last edited 1 month ago by an anonymous user

Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act

Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act
Great Seal of the United States.
Long titleAn Act relating to the control of organized crime in the United States.
Colloquial acronym(s)
  • OCCA
  • RICO
Nickname(s)Organized Crime Control Act of 1970
Enacted by the 91st United States Congress
EffectiveOctober 15, 1970
Citations
Public Law91-452
Stat.84 Stat. 922-3 aka 84 Stat. 941
Codification
Title(s) amended18 U.S.C.: Crimes and Criminal Procedure
U.S.C. sections created18 U.S.C. ch. 96 §§ 1961-1968
Legislative history
  • Introduced in the Senate as S. 30 byJohn L. McClellan (DAR)
  • Passed the Senate on January 23, 1970 (74-1)
  • Passed the House on October 7, 1970 (341-26)
  • Signed into law by President Richard Nixon on October 15, 1970

Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, commonly referred to as the RICO Act or simply RICO, is a United States federal law that provides for extended criminal penalties and a civil cause of actionfor acts performed as part of an ongoingcriminal organization. The RICO Act focuses specifically on racketeering, and it allows theleaders of a syndicate to be tried for the crimes which they ordered others to do or assisted them, closing a perceived loophole that allowed someone who told a man to, for example, murder, to be exempt from the trial because he did not actually commit the crime personally.

RICO was enacted by section 901(a) of theOrganized Crime Control Act of 1970 (Pub.L. 91–452, 84 Stat. 922, enacted October 15, 1970). RICO is codified as Chapter 96 of Title 18 of the United States Code, 18 U.S.C. § 1961–1968. Under the close supervision of Senator John Little McClellan, the Chairman of the Committee for which he worked, G. Robert Blakey drafted the "RICO Act," Title IX of the Organized Crime Control Act of 1970, signed into law by Richard M. Nixon. While its original use in the 1970s was to prosecute the Mafia as well as others who were actively engaged in organized crime, its later application has been more widespread.

Beginning in 1972, 33 States adopted state RICO laws to be able to prosecute similar conduct.

Summary


Comments

Popular posts from this blog

TRUMP FOR PRESIDENCY!! 2017

Dangers of smoking and taking marijuana candy alternatives

YOUR LOVE YOUR LIES, written by Tannie Gwin 2013